Evidence for the link between well-being outcomes and long-term outcomes

We all know that well-being matters. But as providers of services for young people, or funders of services, what we are often after is long term outcomes – success in employment or a reduction in crime, for example.

However, overwhelmingly, youth services do their work through a process of personal and social development. Capturing the effect of this is where NPC’s Well-being Measure is valuable – providing robust measures of changes in self-esteem, resilience, and satisfaction with aspect of their lives.

But what about the link between the social and emotional capabilities and long term outcomes? How do improvements in self-esteem or emotional well-being help to improve young people’s employability?

There is evidence for a link between well-being outcomes and long-term outcomes, from a range of different academic sources. The diagram below is taken from the Young Foundation’s report for the Department for Education-funded Catalyst Consortium, which reviews the evidence available. You can read the report here.

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About John Copps

John is part of NPC's research and consulting team and is the founder of NPC's Well-being Measure, a social business that provides an online tool to measure young people’s well-being. He has eight years experience of research and consulting, and is passionate about how data can be used to improve the performance of organisations. John is a regular contributor to NPC's blog and has also contributed to pieces for BBC Radio, the Guardian, and the Financial Times. John is a governor of a secondary school.
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