NPC’s Well-being Measure profiled in The Guardian

Over recent months, measuring well-being has caught the imagination of charities and funders across the UK. As the pressure to demonstrate value grows, quantifying changes in how young people think and feel about their lives, is rightly getting more attention.

Today the Guardian has profiled NPC’s Well-being Measure in its Society section. The article includes interviews with our Well-being Measure Team and with two of our customers – The Outward Bound Trust and Toynbee Hall.

Quoted in the article, Marcus Duran of Toynbee Hall, said about his experience using the Well-being Measure “With something like wellbeing, which can seem quite intangible, it’s so easy for funders to turn round and say, ‘It’s all very pretty and very nice but what difference is it making? … You do really have to fight your corner, and being able to say, ‘This is the national picture and this is what we’re doing,’ puts you in a much better position. It gives us kudos to be able to say we’re not making this stuff up.”

You can read the Guardian article here.

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About John Copps

John is part of NPC's research and consulting team and is the founder of NPC's Well-being Measure, a social business that provides an online tool to measure young people’s well-being. He has eight years experience of research and consulting, and is passionate about how data can be used to improve the performance of organisations. John is a regular contributor to NPC's blog and has also contributed to pieces for BBC Radio, the Guardian, and the Financial Times. John is a governor of a secondary school.
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