NPC’s Well-being Measure – not yet available outside the UK

We have been contacted by organisations all over the world – from Australia to Brazil, the Philippines, Lesotho, and the US – all wanting to know whether they can use the tool, and whether it is valid in their country.

For now, we strongly advise limiting use to inside the UK. This is for two main reasons:

  1. The Well-being Measure works by standardising your results using a UK national baseline. We don’t know enough about the global differences between the various aspects of young people’s well-being to be confident about providing an accurate picture in other countries.
  2. The meaning of the survey questions may be different in other cultures and contexts. Words have different meanings in different parts of the world. In particular, The Well-being Measure cannot be straightfowardly translated and applied to young people that speak a different language. The process of translation changes the meaning of the survey and means that you are not asking the same questions. For other English-speaking countries, although there are examples of surveys that have been developed and used internationally, we haven’t yet explored this issue in sufficient detail to be confident about whether the Well-being Measure could follow suit.

To keep up-to-date with future developments with NPC’s Well-being Measure, you can sign up to receive our newsletter here.

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About John Copps

John is part of NPC's research and consulting team and is the founder of NPC's Well-being Measure, a social business that provides an online tool to measure young people’s well-being. He has eight years experience of research and consulting, and is passionate about how data can be used to improve the performance of organisations. John is a regular contributor to NPC's blog and has also contributed to pieces for BBC Radio, the Guardian, and the Financial Times. John is a governor of a secondary school.
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